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AGE OF CZESLAW MILOSZ, THE
$29.95

This handsome documentary commemorates the 100th birthday of Czeslaw Milosz, the Nobel Prize-winning Polish-Lithuanian poet who spanned his century. Famous cultural figures, friends, and family retrace the life and work of this extraordinary thinker, joined by Milosz’s own words and a wealth of archival material. Born in a cross-border region of Lithuania in 1911, Milosz grew up a polyglot, fluent in Polish, Lithuanian, Russian, English, and French. After studying law, Milosz travelled to Paris, where he published poems, fiction, and essays. This led him to Warsaw, where he spent World War II working for underground presses. Surviving Nazi rule, he went on to serve as a cultural attache of Poland in Paris. In 1951, he defected to the West and wrote his most famous prose work, The Captive Mind. By 1960, Milosz had emigrated to the U.S. to teach at the University of California, Berkeley. Throughout, he continued to publish poetry that spoke in clear words to the human condition during times of tumult. With the fall of the Iron Curtain, Milosz returned to Poland, where he passed away in 2004 at the age of 93. More than a well-researched biography, The Age of Czeslaw Milosz is a lyrical reflection on a life spent in exile yet filled with humor, passion, and big ideas that often went against the spirit of the age. In Lithuanian with English subtitles.

Juozas Javaitis---Lithuania---2012---185 mins.
AS GOES JANESVILLE
$29.95

As Goes Janesville reports from ground zero of the recession-ridden heartland. When bankrupt General Motors shut down their century-old plant in Janesville, Wisconsin, in 2008, thousands of workers lost their jobs. Meanwhile, local business leaders seized the moment to woo new companies with the promise of lower wages, reduced regulation, and tax breaks. To that end, they formed a powerful alliance with newly-elected Republican governor Scott Walker, whose “divide and conquer” anti-union strategy would divide the state, trigger an historic recall election, and thrust Wisconsin politics onto front pages nationwide. A cautionary tale for a polarized country, the film follows three years in the lives of laid off workers struggling to survive, business leaders trying to reinvent their local economy, and a state senator caught in the middle. "An up-close view of one of the meanest and most dramatic chapters in recent American politics...The film has a narrative drive unusual for a 60-minute television documentary, pulling us along like a political thriller" (NY Times). Nominated for Best Documentary at the Chicago International Film Festival.

Brad Lichtenstein---USA---2008---88 mins.
BOTTOM OF THE NINTH
$19.95

Directed by Oscar nominee Chuck Braverman (Curtain Call), Bottom of the Ninth is a real-life Bull Durham story. This documentary chronicles a season with the Somerset Patriots, a minor league baseball team in a race for the championship. Interviews with players and coaches reveal that the heart and soul of America's national pastime is not with the overpaid, scandal-ridden major leagues, but in the farm clubs and minor leagues where team members play out of a true passion for the game. A Directors Guild nominee for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Documentary.

Charles Braverman---USA---2002---50 mins.
COLLAPSE OF COMMUNISM: THE UNTOLD STORY
$18.95

The Collapse of Communism demonstrates that political change does not necessarily mean a changing of the guard. Director Robert Buchar’s central thesis is that the threat Russia posed to the U.S. during the Cold War has not abated since the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The same people who opposed the U.S. remain in power today, and they have since gained the higher ground. Beginning with perestroika, Buchar weaves a series of interviews with notable dissidents, defectors, government agents, journalists, and professors into a compelling account of how economic turmoil in the former Soviet Union led top officials to re-strategize its conflict with the West. Using the binary of communism vs. democracy as an ideological smokescreen, Russia was able to goad the U.S. into believing the Cold War had been “won.” Buchar contends that Russia is now uniquely able to project an agreeable image of its internal politics to the West while using its Cold War espionage networks and connections to organized crime to press its strategic advantage. The film will likely raise eyebrows among more skeptical viewers, but Buchar’s case is enlivened by the inclusion of a news ticker, vignettes, special effects, and a soundtrack befitting a spy thriller. Whether you’re sold on all the film’s claims, you can’t deny this oft-repeated notion: the most effective form of deception is telling someone what they want to hear and letting them write the story. Featuring former Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates and Tennent H. Bagley, former chief of counterintelligence for the CIA’s Soviet division.

Robert Buchar---USA/Belgium/Czech Republic---2012---107 mins.
COLLAPSE OF COMMUNISM: THE UNTOLD STORY (BLU-RAY)
$29.95

The Collapse of Communism demonstrates that political change does not necessarily mean a changing of the guard. Director Robert Buchar’s central thesis is that the threat Russia posed to the U.S. during the Cold War has not abated since the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The same people who opposed the U.S. remain in power today, and they have since gained the higher ground. Beginning with perestroika, Buchar weaves a series of interviews with notable dissidents, defectors, government agents, journalists, and professors into a compelling account of how economic turmoil in the former Soviet Union led top officials to re-strategize its conflict with the West. Using the binary of communism vs. democracy as an ideological smokescreen, Russia was able to goad the U.S. into believing the Cold War had been “won.” Buchar contends that Russia is now uniquely able to project an agreeable image of its internal politics to the West while using its Cold War espionage networks and connections to organized crime to press its strategic advantage. The film will likely raise eyebrows among more skeptical viewers, but Buchar’s case is enlivened by the inclusion of a news ticker, vignettes, special effects, and a soundtrack befitting a spy thriller. Whether you’re sold on all the film’s claims, you can’t deny this oft-repeated notion: the most effective form of deception is telling someone what they want to hear and letting them write the story. Featuring former Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates and Tennent H. Bagley, former chief of counterintelligence for the CIA’s Soviet division.

Robert Buchar---USA/Belgium/Czech Republic---2012---107 mins.
GOFF IN THE DESERT
$29.95

In this unique documentary, German filmmaker Heinz Emigholz presents the work of inventive American architect Bruce Goff. Apprenticed at age 12 but never formally educated as an architect, Goff's work displays a unique style that sets it apart from most 20th-century architecture. The Episcopal Church in Tulsa built in the 1920s is a towering Art Deco icon, while the Hopewell Baptist Church in Edmond resembles a strange futuristic concrete teepee that challenges the surrounding landscape. Through filmed photographs, Emigholz brilliantly exposes the hidden details of Goff's fascinating structures. In German with English subtitles.

Heinz Emigholz---Germany---2003---110 mins.
GREAT DAY IN HAVANA
$19.95

The state of the arts in Cuba's capital city is examined in this documentary by American filmmakers Laurie Ann Schag and Casey Stoll. Cuban artists, filmmakers and musicians, including sculptor Pedro "Pulido" Gonzalez,            performance artist Tania Bruguera, singer/songwriter Carlos Varela, and jazz musicians Ele Valdes and Carlos Alfonso, discuss their work and reveal their personal feelings toward Fidel Castro, the U.S. embargo against Cuba, and their country's political climate. Also, Cuban expatriate filmmaker Elio Ruiz looks at the large community of Cuban exiles throughout the world. Narrated by Laurie Ann Schag/Casey Stoll---USA---2000---83 mins.
HOPPER'S SILENCE
$19.95

One of the most recognizable works of American art, Edward Hopper’s painting Nighthawks encapsulates the alienation and loneliness of the modern urban milieu. His haunting, enigmatic paintings are defined by a hard-edged realism and the presence of isolated figures alone in their thoughts. In life, Hopper was notoriously taciturn and seldom gave interviews or appeared in public. Director Brian O'Doherty, who knew Hopper and his wife, Jo, offers a rare documentary portrait of this aloof artist that is astute and revealing. O’Doherty compares the paintings to the locations that inspired them to suggest the connection between style and subject. Plus, Hopper and Jo are shown in footage from an old television interview, in which the painter is one step this side of mute. Jo often answers for him, a telling detail that says much about their relationship. The film’s subtle combination of observation and interview footage contains a surprising amount of insight and information. “Offers interesting and pragmatic insights and avoids undue presumption or esoteric analysis” (NY Times). “An exquisite portrait of this quiet artist and his world” (Getty Center).

Brian O’Doherty---USA---1981---47 mins.
HUNGRY FOR MONSTERS
$29.95

This gripping documentary captures the nightmare that one family endures after a teenage girl confessed to a teacher that her father molested her. During therapy sessions to recover "repressed memories," the daughter exaggerates and embellishes her accusations as social workers, therapists, and officers of the court inadvertently egg her on. The girl's tales of satanic rituals and wild orgies eventually lead to arrests, years of turmoil and heartache for all. "...a sharp and unrelenting portrait of the American system of justice run amok" (Worldview, Chicago Public Radio). George Paul Csicsery---USA---2003---69 mins.
INTERVIEW, THE
$29.95

From his work in the fiction mode to documentary to installation, German filmmaker Harun Farocki has consistently explored ideas of language, ideology, perception, and contemporary audio-visual culture. In this unique documentary, Farocki draws on the anxiety of unemployment as he follows the efforts of several candidates who take part in a training program designed to teach them how to apply for a job. The goal is to learn how to market and sell themselves, a goal that Farocki exposes as demeaning and superficial. An insightful look at the manipulative tactics of big business, Farocki's film is as thought provoking as it is revealing. In German with English subtitles. Harun Farocki---Germany---1997---60 mins.
ISA: THE PEOPLE'S DIVA
$19.95

Isa Kremer lived life to the fullest as the premier singer of authentic Yiddish songs. The first woman to perform Yiddish songs on the concert stage, she legitimized the language as a valid and vital part of Jewish culture. A classically trained opera star, Isa acted out these folk tunes using her voice, gestures, and mannerisms, offering emotional and dramatic interpretations. Using rare footage, hundreds of photos, and interviews with friends, family members, performers, and scholars, Isa: The People’s Diva chronicles Kremer’s life across five decades. Not only did her career parallel some of the 20th-century’s most tumultuous events--the Russian Revolution, the rise of Nazism, and the volatile politics of South America--her career was directly affected by their outcome. Despite personal trauma and political turmoil, Kremer never backed down from controversy, took the easy path, or surrendered to pressure to stop performing in Yiddish. Isa: The People’s Diva reclaims the legacy of this complex, passionate woman, who transcended both time and geographic borders, from the lost pages of history. “[Kremer] searches for hidden treasure in the realm of art. She sings with her voice, her body, her eyes, and she captivates with her charm” (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 19, 1924).

Ted Schillinger---USA---2000---56 mins.
LAST PULLMAN CAR, THE
$29.95

In 1864, George Pullman began selling his famous railroad sleeping cars, which helped him build a vast industrial empire that was supposed to last forever. A model of the modern employer, Pullman had constructed a self-sustaining village for his workers just outside Chicago, with its own school, sewage system, and public works. However, nothing lasts forever, and by 1981, Pullman workers found themselves in the midst of a fight not only for their jobs but the future of the American rail car industry. The Last Pullman Car traces 100 years in the history of this unique company that grappled with government, union and corporate policies. "Never intrusive and avoiding obvious, human interest techniques, Pullman Car makes the members of local 1834 come alive on their own terms” (Larry Kart, Chicago Tribune). “This film is a battlecry!” (Studs Terkel).

Gordon Quinn/Jerry Blumenthal/Jenny Rohrer/Greg LeRoy---USA---1983---56 mins.
LITTLE DEATHS (LAS MUERTES CHIQUITAS)
$29.95

For her epic exploration of the female orgasm, Catalan artist Mireia Sallares interviewed 30 Mexican women from various walks of life: professors, prostitutes, psychologists, nuns, revolutionaries, and former child brides. Her interviews go beyond the “little deaths” of the title, seamlessly moving between issues of sexual violence, political protest, love, family, and mortality. In a culture where sexual taboos run deep, what the women of Little Deaths have in common is a belief in liberation and self-discovery through sexuality, and a remarkable courage in the face of tragedy and oppression. Filmed over four years, this two-part documentary is the centerpiece of Las Muertes Chiquitas, Sallares’s larger multimedia project encompassing photography, installations, a book, and discussions held around the world--all unified by women’s perspectives on orgasms, pleasure, pain, power, violence, and death. In Spanish with optional English subtitles.

Mireia Sallares---Mexico---2009---286 mins.
MR. BING & L'ART NOUVEAU
$29.95

Award-winning documentarian Francoise Levie specializes in biographies of unique individuals and Siegfried Bing is no exception. Bing was the inspiration and force behind the art movement known as art nouveau,        promoting artists as diverse and talented as Munch and Toulouse-Lautrec. Levie shows how Bing put his personal stamp on the late 19th century art world by exposing Europe to Asian arts, promoting decorative arts, and handling the work of key artists. In French with English subtitles. Francoise Levie---France---2004---52 mins.
MUHAMMAD ALI, THE GREATEST
$29.95

Not to be confused with the Hollywood biopic, The Greatest (1977), this documentary by acclaimed photographer and filmmaker William Klein is a vibrant, intimate portrait of one of the greatest sports figures of modern times. The first portion, shot from 1964-65, covers the period of Ali's title fight and rematch with Sonny Liston, when he was still known as Cassius Clay. Klein later expanded the film to feature length by following the historic "Rumble in the Jungle" match against George Foreman in Zaire in 1974. Rather than highlight fight footage, Klein focuses on Ali and his era, with glimpses of such notables as Malcolm X, Norman Mailer and The Beatles. The changing nature of Ali's inner circle, the fighter's spiritual and political complexity, and the racial climate of the times are all brilliantly captured.

William Klein---France---1964-1974---110 mins.
NET, THE
$24.95

Stunning in its revelations, Lutz Dammbeck's documentary explores the incredibly complex back-story of Ted Kaczynski, the infamous Unabomber, by situating him within the late 20th Century web of technology that he grew to oppose. A marvelously subversive approach to the history of the Internet, Dammbeck's film combines speculative travelogue and investigative journalism to trace contrasting counter cultural responses to the cybernetic revolution.  The film touches on utopianism, anarchism, terrorism, CIA, LSD, MK-ULTRA, Tim Leary, Ken Kesey and more as it explores conspiracies and upheavals, secrets and cover-ups. In German with English subtitles.  Lutz Dammbeck---Germany---2003---115 mins.
NORTH KOREA: A DAY IN THE LIFE
$29.95

For this rare look inside North Korea, director Pieter Fleury gained unprecedented access to a country generally cloaked in secrecy. Using "a day in the life" format, Fleury follows the daily routines of a typical North Korean family as they go to work, attend school, and participate in English classes. Though the country's inhabitants sincerely put their best face forward, the relentless images and ritualized practices of government propaganda offer a telling portrait of this controversial country. In English and Korean with optional English subtitles..

Pieter Fleury---Netherlands---2004---48 mins.
ORIGIN OF CHRISTIANITY
$99.95

The world's leading biblical scholars gather for this international symposium that created a sensation when released on French television. From Paris to Jerusalem, from Cambridge to Harvard, from Dublin to Rome, these diverse specialists offer a penetrating perspective on the New Testament and provide key insights into the 2000-year old mystery that is Christianity. Best-selling authors and award-winning television producers Gerard Mordillat and Jerome Prieur spent three years assembling experts and compiling research to deliver a compelling combination of faith, inspiration, and history.  Gerard Mordillat/Jerome Prieur---France---2003---520 mins.
PEOPLE VS. PAUL CRUMP, THE
$29.95

Before directing The French Connection, The Exorcist, and Killer Joe, William Friedkin made one of the most powerful documentaries you’ve never seen. On March 20, 1953, five black men robbed a meatpacking plant in Chicago’s Union Stock Yards. Their getaway went awry, and a security guard was shot and killed. Within a week, all five men were arrested. Four received jail sentences and were eventually paroled. The fifth, Paul Crump, then 22, confessed under questionable interrogation tactics, then retracted, only to be convicted and sentenced to the electric chair. After 14 stays of execution, Crump met Friedkin, then a local TV director, in the Cook County Jail. Friedkin so believed in Crump’s innocence and his worth as a human being that he and his cinematographer Bill Butler (Jaws) took to the streets with lightweight cameras to appeal for Crump’s return to society. The resulting film contributed to the commutation of Crump’s sentence and launched Friedkin’s Hollywood career.

“Crude, rude, and bursting with 'tude, Crump is historically a kind of verite-era prophecy of Errol Morris's The Thin Blue Line--both in its focus on an unjustly convicted death-row convict and in its brazen chop-shop approach to the precepts of documentary filmmaking” (Village Voice). Winner of the Golden Gate Award at the San Francisco International Film Festival.

William Friedkin---USA---1962---60 mins.
RAINBOW MAN
$24.95

This documentary from one of the filmmakers behind the Oscar-nominated doc, The Weather Underground, looks at Rollen Frederick Stewart, otherwise known as "The Rainbow Man," who rose to strange notoriety in the 1970's by appearing at televised sporting events donned in a multicolor afro wig and holding a sign reading John 3:16. Director Sam Green offers a resonant look at Stewart's life, which eventually found him dissolved into a media obsessive, living in his car, desperately studying TV Guides for a chance in the spotlight. Also includes three Sam Green shorts, Pie Fight 69 (co-directed with Christian Bruno), The Fabulous Stains (co-directed with Sarah Jacobson), and N Judah 5:30. Sam Green---USA---1997---70 mins.